Senior Voice -

Support groups and training for family caregivers

June schedule

 


The Kenai Peninsula Family Caregiver Support Program will hold the following meetings and trainings this month:

June 4, Caregiver Peer Support Meeting at Sterling Senior Center, 1 to 2 p.m.

June 11, Caregiver Peer Support Meeting at Soldotna Senior Center, 1 to 3 p.m.

June 17, Caregiver Training at Kenai Senior Center, 1 to 3 p.m. Topic is “Mayo Clinic for Heart Health.” Understand your condition, eat well to feel well, and learn about soothing therapies.

June 25, Caregiver Peer Support Meeting at Soldotna Senior Center, 1 to 3 p.m.

There is no charge for these services and everyone is invited to attend. Training sessions provide 2 hours of Continuing Education Units for people with CNAs.

For more information, call Diane or Dani at 907-262-1280.

Southeast

 The Juneau Family Caregiver Support Group meets the second Wednesday of each month (June 12) in the conference room of KTOO’s studio, 360 Egan Drive, noon to 1:30 p.m.

The Ketchikan Family Caregiver Support Group meets the second Friday of each month (June 14), upstairs at the Ketchikan Senior Center at noon.

The Sitka Family Caregiver Support Group meets the third Wednesday of each month (June 19). For more information, call Brave Heart Volunteers, 747-4600.

Other locations

For information on caregiver support group meetings around the state:

Anchorage, 561-3313

Fairbanks, 452-2277

Homer, 235-2295

Juneau, 463-6164 or 463-6198

Ketchikan, 225-8080

Kodiak, 486-6181

Nome, 443-4507

Palmer/Wasilla, 746-3413

Sitka, 747-4600

Family caregiver tip of the month

Sometimes as caregivers we struggle to find the value and meaning of our interactions with the loved one in our care. This is especially true when caring for a person with dementia. We tend to dwell too much on what has been lost instead of celebrating the simple everyday experiences that are the most fulfilling.

Our loved one’s abilities may be very limited but there are many things that you

can do together to bring pleasure and a sense of purpose to both of you. Somehow we tend to think that activities must be special or exciting but they need not be either. Sitting and looking at the sunset together, watching birds at a feeder, washing the dishes, folding the laundry, weeding the garden, or just taking a walk are simple activities that need little in the way of attention or memory. And yet they can bring a great deal of satisfaction to both the caregiver and the recipient.

Old interests and hobbies are always clues to what a person might enjoy doing. Always remember that a healthy person can look forward to a good outcome from an activity but a person with memory loss experiences only the here and now so just celebrate the moment!

– Diane Halverson, Kenai Peninsula Family Caregiver Support Program

 
 

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