Articles written by john schieszer


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  • Eggs for heart health; dissolving body sensors; good grooves

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jul 1, 2022

    Eggs pack important health benefit Researchers now are reporting that moderate egg consumption can increase the amount of heart-healthy metabolites in the blood, and eating up to one egg per day may help lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol, but they also contain a variety of essential nutrients. There is conflicting evidence as to whether egg consumption is beneficial or harmful to heart health. A 2018 study published in the journal...

  • New guidelines for best sleep, aspirin use

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jun 1, 2022

    How much sleep do I need? Everyone is different when it comes to sleep. Some people need much more than others. Well, it now turns out that seven hours may be the ideal amount of sleep for people in their middle age and upwards, with too little or too much sleep associated with poorer cognitive performance and mental health, according to a new British study from the University of Cambridge and Fudan University. Sleep plays an important role in enabling cognitive function and maintaining good...

  • Good news for coffee drinkers and golfers

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|May 1, 2022

    Prunes pack powerful nutrient punch A prune or six a day may help keep inflammation at bay, according to a new study looking at daily prune consumption. It found eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health and reduce inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a loss of bone strength caused by reduced mineral density in the bones. Osteoporosis increases the risk of fracture, especially in older adults. Previous research has shown that the...

  • New research on Parkinson's, prostate cancer, brain benefits of having pets

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Apr 1, 2022

    Hidden brain benefits come with pet ownership Owning a pet, like a dog or cat, especially for five years or longer, may be linked to slower cognitive decline in older adults, according to a new study. In fact, having a dog for more than 10 years may have important brain benefits. “Prior studies have suggested that the human-animal bond may have health benefits like decreasing blood pressure and stress,” said study author Dr. Tiffany Braley with the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann...

  • Robot performs first solo laparoscopic surgery

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Mar 1, 2022

    It’s a new era when it comes to robotics. Researchers are reporting that a robot has performed laparoscopic surgery without the guiding hand of a human. Designed by a team of Johns Hopkins University researchers, the Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) can provide a host of potential benefits. “Our findings show that we can automate one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in surgery, the reconnection of two ends of an intestine. The STAR performed the procedure in four animals and it pro...

  • Research update: Parkinson's, avocados, eliminating flu shots

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Feb 1, 2022

    Promising advance in treating Parkinson’s disease Researchers have solved a decade-long mystery about a critical protein linked to Parkinson’s disease that could help to fast-track treatments for the incurable disease. The researchers have developed a “live action” view of a protein called PINK1 in exquisite molecular detail. The discovery explains how the protein is activated in the cell and leads to the development of Parkinson’s disease. When this protein is not working correctly, it kills...

  • Promising research on treating kidney stones, combating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jan 1, 2022

    New handheld technology is ushering a new approach to treating kidney stones Physicians may be able to maneuver small kidney stones to the ureter so they can be expelled naturally. Patients dealing with small kidney stones that persist after surgery may soon have options to “push” the stones from their body, rather than face another invasive procedure. A clinical trial at the Kidney Stone Center at the UW Medical Center in Seattle is testing the ability of ultrasound waves to dislodge and mov...

  • Breast cancer vaccine; organs from pigs; vitamin D

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Dec 1, 2021

    A breast cancer vaccine is becoming a step closer to reality. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic are studying a vaccine for preventing triple-negative breast cancer, the most aggressive and lethal form of the disease. Currently, the researchers are conducting a phase I trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of the vaccine in women with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved an investigational new drug application for the...

  • 3D-printed vaccine patches, "shockwave" technology, and high-protein noodles

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Nov 1, 2021

    Sonic waves for clearing coronary arteries Some heart centers around the country now are using novel lithotripsy technology to treat coronary blockages. This new technology is known as intravascular lithotripsy (IVL) and it’s based on the lithotripsy technology used to break up kidney stones. Shockwave technology delivers sonic waves to break-up problematic calcium, allowing the blocked artery to safely expand while restoring blood flow through a stent implant. As coronary artery disease p...

  • The effects of exercise and where you live on longevity

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Oct 1, 2021

    It’s never too late to get active A study in more than 30,000 heart patients shows that becoming active later in life can be nearly as beneficial to survival as continued activity. “These encouraging findings highlight how patients with coronary heart disease may benefit by preserving or adopting a physically active lifestyle,” says study author Dr. Nathalia Gonzalez of the University of Bern, Switzerland. This study investigated activity levels over time and their relationship to the risk...

  • New high-tech may aid the visually impaired

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Sep 1, 2021

    Wearable devices helping visually impaired Updated computer technology now is revolutionizing care for those who are visually impaired. A new study is showing that wearing a vibrating collision device can reduce collisions in adults who are blind or have low level vision. Researchers found that a wearable computer vision device can reduce collisions for both people who are blind and those who are visually impaired and using a long cane and/or guide dog by 37%, compared to using other mobility...

  • Better cancer detection, blood pressure control

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Aug 1, 2021

    Detecting cancer long before symptoms There may now be a way to find cancer before symptoms ever occur. A new blood test, which can detect more than 50 types of cancer, has been found to be accurate enough to be rolled out as a multi-cancer screening test among people at higher risk of the disease, including patients age 50 years or older. In a paper published in the journal Annals of Oncology, researchers report that the test accurately detected cancer, often before any symptoms arose, while ha...

  • New 'smart toilet' will be able to analyze stool

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jul 1, 2021

    Smart toilet may be able to analyze stool For the first time, researchers are suggesting that an artificial intelligence tool can be used for long-term tracking and management of chronic gastrointestinal ailments. Scientists at Duke University have added an artificial intelligence tool to the standard toilet to help analyze patients’ stool and give gastroenterologists the information they need to provide appropriate treatment, according to a new study. This novel technology could assist in m...

  • Detecting strokes earlier using a phone app; Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer's

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jun 1, 2021

    Preventing strokes with a phone app It may soon be possible to detect atrial fibrillation with your phone. About one-third of ischemic strokes, those triggered by blood clots, are caused by atrial fibrillation, which is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Since many people don’t have symptoms and are unaware of its presence, atrial fibrillation often goes undiagnosed. In some cases, a stroke is the first sign that a person has the disorder. American Indians are more at risk for atrial fibrill...

  • Health benefits of exercise, wine and coffee

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|May 1, 2021

    Wine drinking may help protect against cataracts People who consume alcohol moderately appear less likely to develop cataracts that require surgery. Wine consumption showed the strongest protective effect, suggesting that antioxidants which are abundant in red wine may play a role in cataract prevention. However, people who drank daily or nearly daily had about a 6% higher risk of cataract surgery compared with people who consumed alcohol moderately. The new research was published in...

  • New insights on golf, plant protein and joint replacements

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Apr 1, 2021

    Boosting veggie intake may benefit the brain What you eat on a daily basis may be very important in terms of preventing dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a condition that often precedes full-blown dementia. A new study shows that there may be hidden brain benefits from eating more vegetables. Postmenopausal women who ate high levels of plant protein had lower risks of premature death, cardiovascular disease and dementia-related death compared with women who ate less plant proteins,...

  • Robotics and knee replacements; benefits of tea, coffee

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Mar 1, 2021

    Newly discovered benefits of tea and coffee Adding more tea and coffee drinking to your daily routine may reap some important hidden health benefits. Stroke and heart attack survivors can reduce multiple causes of death and prevent further cardiovascular events by drinking green tea, according to a new Japanese study. Researchers also found daily coffee consumption benefited heart attack survivors by lowering their risk of death after a heart attack and can prevent heart attacks or strokes in...

  • Cancer drug shows promise reducing hearing loss

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Feb 1, 2021

    Cancer drug repurposed may help protect against hearing loss According to the World Health Organization, around 466 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss, a number the organization projects will double by 2050 to affect 1 in 10 people. However, a new study out of Creighton University School of Medicine has identified a drug that has the potential to protect against or treat hearing loss. The findings are significant because no such FDA-approved drug currently exists, and the drug...

  • Discovery may help to track, combat Alzheimer's

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Jan 1, 2021

    A better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease Some very good news to report when it comes to battling Alzheimer’s disease: A novel form of an Alzheimer’s protein found in the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord indicates what stage of the disease a person is in, according to a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Tau tangles are thought to be toxic to neurons, and their spread through the brain foretells the death of brain tissue and cogni...

  • COVID-19 and rheumatic diseases; helpful wearables

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Dec 1, 2020

    COVID-19 infection rates low among older adults with rheumatic diseases Texas researchers are happy to report some reassuring news for older adults living with rheumatic diseases. A new study is showing that the COVID-19 infection incidence has been low among adults with rheumatic diseases, and most of those infected only have a mild course of illness. Additionally, deaths have been low among rheumatic disease patients infected with COVID-19. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to surge...

  • Promising news on COVID testing, mild exercise

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Nov 1, 2020

    At-home testing for COVID infection Researchers have developed a new type of multiplexed test with a low-cost sensor that may enable the at-home diagnosis of a COVID-19 infection through rapid analysis of small volumes of saliva or blood, without the involvement of a medical professional, in less than 10 minutes. One feature of the COVID-19 virus that makes it so difficult to contain is that it can be easily spread to others by a person who has yet to show any signs of infection. The carrier of...

  • Breakthroughs promise faster, better COVID testing

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Oct 1, 2020

    COVID testing using a smartphone Researchers are reporting they may be able to test for COVID-19 in just 30 minutes with the use of a smartphone. As COVID-19 continues to spread, bottlenecks in supplies and laboratory personnel have led to long waiting times for COVID testing results in some areas. In a new study, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign researchers have demonstrated a prototype of a rapid COVID-19 molecular test and a simple-to-use, portable instrument for reading the results...

  • Older adults show resilience during the pandemic

    John Schieszer, For Senior Voice|Sep 1, 2020

    Older adults may be doing better during this pandemic than many people may realize. A new study involving older adults with pre-existing major depressive disorder has found no increase in depression and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers from five institutions, including UCLA, found that the older adults, who were already enrolled in ongoing studies of treatment-resistant depression, also exhibited resilience to the stress of physical distancing and isolation. “We thought they w...

  • COVID-19: New testing, medications, insights

    John Schieszer, Medical Minutes|Sep 1, 2020

    Developing a multi-drug cocktail against COVID-19 A new study has identified 21 existing drugs that stop the replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Scientists analyzed one of the world’s largest collections of known drugs for their ability to block the replication of SARS-CoV-2. They identified 100 molecules with confirmed antiviral activity in laboratory tests. Of these, 21 drugs were determined to be effective at concentrations that could be safely achieved in patients. N...

  • Fall educational opportunities abound for Alaska seniors

    John Schieszer, For Senior Voice|Sep 1, 2020

    If you would like to improve your computer skills or take an art class, now is the perfect time. In Alaska, never before has there been such an opportunity to learn online and expand your mind by signing up for educational courses. OLÉ! Anchorage In Anchorage, seniors can sign up for fall session classes offered by OLÉ! (Opportunities for Lifelong Education). Although there is no minimum age requirement, classes are geared to adults age 50 and older. Courses begin September 28 and they are a...

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